high fraud countries

EP14: List of USCIS High Fraud Countries & Low Fraud Countries

In this episode of the podcast, we’ll talk about the USCIS list of high fraud countries as well as low fraud countries.

Have you ever wondered whether your country is considered high fraud in the eyes of USCIS? Well, wonder no more!

I’ve put together a list of high fraud and low fraud countries based thousands of people I’ve talked to from many different countries.

This list is not a complete list and does not list every single country that is considered high fraud to USCIS.

But, before we get into the list of high fraud countries, lets talk about administrative processing and what could cause your case to be selected to be placed “AP”.

Related Post: Waivers for Fraud and Willful Misrepresentation

Who Is Most Likely To Be In AP? 

  • Your case is weak.
    •  If your case is looked at as weak and you barely can show that you are eligible for the visa, it’s likely you will be in administrative processing until the Consulate or Embassy determines that you qualify. Don’t let this happen to you!
    • Make sure that you provide TOO MUCH evidence instead of just enough. This is called front-loading your application and it’s important for those of you who are applying from a high fraud country.
  • You do not have enough evidence (and cant provide more).
    • If you’ve already made the mistake of sending off your application without much evidence, don’t worry. USCIS will give you one last shot by sending you a request for evidence (RFE) that asks for more evidence.
    • If you can’t provide more evidence, then you will likely be placed in administrative processing for them to figure out whether you are eligible based on the documents you’ve already submitted. Unfortunately, if they find that you do not qualify for the visa, the Consulate or Embassy will return your approved petition to USCIS as an NOIR (Notice of Intent to Revoke).
  • You (the beneficiary) have applied for an immigrant visa before that was denied.
    • Applying for multiple immigrant visas in the past can definitely cause you the be placed in administrative processing. It may not be that they suspect fraud but instead, need to check the details of the previous applications.
    • Having multiple spouse visa or fiancé visa applications filed for you can also be a red flag of immigration fraud. If there was a reason the last relationships didn’t work out, make sure you are honest at your next interview.
  • You have an extensive criminal background. (they will run a background check)
    • Having serious criminal convictions can cause your case to be placed in administrative processing. The Consular and Embassy will complete an extensive background check that will likely pull up information on prior arrests and convictions.
    • Even if an arrest and charge was dismissed and sealed, it may still come up with the background check so it’s best that you are honest on your application and interview.
  • USCIS does not believe your relationship is real.
    • The number one reason most cases for the spouse or fiancé visa are denied right away is suspicion of immigration fraud. Administrative processing will result in a denial unless you can provide additional evidence of your relationship.
    • Your case is weak.
    •  If your case is looked at as weak and you barely can show that you are eligible for the visa, it’s likely you will be in administrative processing until the Consulate or Embassy determines that you qualify. Don’t let this happen to you!
    • Make sure that you provide TOO MUCH evidence instead of just enough. This is called front-loading your application and it’s important for those of you who are applying from a high fraud country.
  • You do not have enough evidence (and cant provide more).
    • If you’ve already made the mistake of sending off your application without much evidence, don’t worry. USCIS will give you one last shot by sending you a request for evidence (RFE) that asks for more evidence.
    • If you can’t provide more evidence, then you will likely be placed in administrative processing for them to figure out whether you are eligible based on the documents you’ve already submitted. Unfortunately, if they find that you do not qualify for the visa, the Consulate or Embassy will return your approved petition to USCIS as an NOIR (Notice of Intent to Revoke).
  • You (the beneficiary) have applied for an immigrant visa before that was denied.
    • Applying for multiple immigrant visas in the past can definitely cause you the be placed in administrative processing. It may not be that they suspect fraud but instead, need to check the details of the previous applications.
    • Having multiple spouse visa or fiancé visa applications filed for you can also be a red flag of immigration fraud. If there was a reason the last relationships didn’t work out, make sure you are honest at your next interview.
  • You have an extensive criminal background. (they will run a background check)
    • Having serious criminal convictions can cause your case to be placed in administrative processing. The Consular and Embassy will complete an extensive background check that will likely pull up information on prior arrests and convictions.
    • Even if an arrest and charge was dismissed and sealed, it may still come up with the background check so it’s best that you are honest on your application and interview.
  • USCIS does not believe your relationship is real.
    • The number one reason most cases for the spouse or fiancé visa are denied right away is suspicion of immigration fraud. Administrative processing will result in a denial unless you can provide additional evidence of your relationship.

Related Post: Marriage Fraud To Get Green Card In Exchange For Money

Related Post: What To Do If You Suspect Your Fiance Of Immigration Fraud

What Countries Are Considered High Fraud?

BI Arrests 3 Connected to San Bernardino Shooter on Marriage Fraud Charges

High fraud countries have one thing in common: their standard of living is much lower than the United States.

This can be a reason why someone who want to commit immigration fraud to better their life by moving to the US.

Many high fraud countries are not part of the visa waiver program (VWP). This means that it is really difficult for someone from the list of countries below to visit the US without first applying for a tourist visa.

Related Post: We Got Married On The Visa Waiver Program, Will I Have Problems Adjusting My Status?

  • Nigeria
  • India
  • Ghana
  • Morocco
  • Yemen
  • Kenya
  • Pakistan
  • Philippines
  • China
  • Mexico

If you are applying from any of the countries on the high fraud list, then it’s time to consider “front-loading” your immigrant application.

What is front-loading?

This means to provide A LOT of evidence of your relationship to prove you are applying for the CR1 spouse visa or K1 fiancé visa because you are in love and not just for a green card and a chance to move to the US.

Related Post: Which Countries Are On The USCIS High Fraud List?

Related Podcast: EP3: What Is Administrative Processing? How Long Does It Take?

Low Fraud Countries 

In addition to the high fraud countries, I believe there are also a list of low fraud countries.

The low fraud countries tend to have a similar standard of living to the United States. This means there is less of a chance for an immigrant from a low fraud country to commit fraud just to get into the United States.

Immigration fraud is often times committed by those looking to find a better life in another country. 

Many consulates in low fraud countries have statistics on how many cases end up as being fraudulent and if this number is statistically low, they may not have to really dig too deeply into the beneficiary.

  • Canada
  • Britain (UK)
  • France
  • Germany
  • Australia
  • Netherlands
  • Switzerland

Most of the countries that are part of the visa waiver program (VWP) are also on the low fraud list.Being from these countries does not mean you don’t have provide a lot of evidence. 

It just means that your case will be looked at with an average amount of skepticism. 

If I Am Placed On AP, How Long Will It Take?

Unfortunately, there is no timeline set by the USCIS on the maximum length of administrative processing.

You know what’s the worst part of being told your case is in administrative processing? Not knowing when it will end!

But here’s the good news: the vast majority of cases will not be in administrative processing for more than a few weeks. I know a few weeks seems like a long time when you’ve been waiting many months just for the interview.

Sometimes, applying for a K1 fiancé visa from a high fraud country can mean a denial but this can be lessened by getting married and applying for the CR1 spouse visa.

One last tip for those of you applying from a high fraud country: don’t let delay in your visa processing affect your relationship.

Long distance marriages often fail due to the stress of the administrative processing.

Additionally, if your case has been stuck in administrative processing, you should contact the US Consulate or Embassy every week to keep your case from falling into a black hole.

Did you find this episode helpful? You may want to listen to episode 3: All about administrative processing.

If you’re ready to apply for the spouse visa or fiancé visa (or your case is pending), consider joining the Migrant Academy. Included with the membership are complete online videos courses, case tracker, member forums and live coaching!

Comments

  1. Hi, please I want to know if a cr1 is review by the USCIS and send back to the consular . would there be any call for interview again . please urgent respond is needed please.

  2. Hi Bleek147, If they are sending your approved petition back to the Consulate, then yes there should be another interview. I’m not sure why USCIS has your petition again was it initially refused?

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